Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Mining in Japan

In: Other Topics

Submitted By xtremepring
Words 1727
Pages 7
Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing, and Mining in Japan

Agriculture, forestry, and fishing form the primary sector of industry of the Japanese economy, together with the Japanese mining industry, but together they account for only 1.3% of gross national product. Only 20% of Japan's land is suitable for cultivation, and the agricultural economy is highly subsidized protected.
Agriculture, forestry, and fishing dominated the Japanese economy until the 1940s, but thereafter declined into relative unimportance. In the late 19th century (Meiji period), these sectors had accounted for more than 80% of employment. Employment in agriculture declined in the pre-war period, but the sector was still the largest employer (about 50% of the work force) by the end of World War II. It was further declined to 23.5% in 1965, 11.9% in 1977, and to 7.2% in 1988. The importance of agriculture in the national economy later continued its rapid decline, with the share of net agricultural production in GNP finally reduced between 1975 and 1989 from 4.1% to 3% In the late 1980s, 85.5% of Japan's farmers were also engaged in occupations outside of farming, and most of these part-time farmers earned most of their income from non-farming activities.
Japan's economic boom that began in the 1950’s left farmers far behind in both income and agricultural technology. They were attracted to the government's food control policy under which high rice prices were guaranteed and farmers were encouraged to increase the output of any crops of their own choice. Farmers became mass producers of rice, even turning their own vegetable gardens into rice fields. Their output swelled to over 14 million metric tons in the late 1960s, a direct result of greater cultivated area and increased yield per unit area, owing to improved cultivation techniques.
Three types of farm households developed: those engaging…...

Similar Documents

Fishing

...Fishing is the activity of catching fish. It is an ancient practice dating back at least 40,000 years. Since the 16th century fishing vessels have been able to cross oceans in pursuit of fish and since the 19th century it has been possible to use larger vessels and in some cases process the fish on board. Fish are normally caught in the wild. Techniques for catching fish include hand gathering, spearing, netting, angling and trapping. The term fishing may be applied to catching other aquatic animals such as shellfish, cephalopods, crustaceans, and echinoderms. The term is not usually applied to catching aquatic mammals, such as whales, where the term whaling is more appropriate, or to farmed fish. In addition to providing food, modern fishing is also a recreational sport. According to FAO statistics, the total number of fishermen and fish farmers is estimated to be 38 million. Fisheries and aquaculture provide direct and indirect employment to over 500 million people.[1] In 2005, the worldwide per capita consumption of fish captured from wild fisheries was 14.4 kilograms, with an additional 7.4 kilograms harvested from fish farms.[2] Contents 1 Prehistory 2 Ancient history 3 Commercial fishing 3.1 Fish netting 3.2 Herring fisheries 3.3 Trawling 3.4 Cod trade 3.5 Trepanging 3.6 Chinese Americans 4 Artisan fishing 5 Recreational fishing 5.1 The fishing reel 5.2 Fly fishing ...

Words: 1399 - Pages: 6

Agriculture (Pakistan Economic Survey)

...Chapter 2 Agriculture Agriculture is central to economic growth and development in Pakistan. Being the dominant sector it contributes 21.4 percent to GDP, employs 45 percent of the country’s labour force and contributes in the growth of other sectors of the economy. The healthy expansion in agriculture stimulates domestic demand for industrial goods and other services and supplying raw material to agro-based industry notably cotton textile industry which is the largest subsector of manufacturing sector. The government under paradigm of the new growth strategy envisioned to enhance growth in agriculture sector by facilitating agriculture productivity sustainable environment, increasing competitiveness in agriculture marketing and trade by providing friendly climate for more investment in the sector. However, draft tenth 5 years plan also envisages improving the productivity, profitability competitiveness and environmental sustainability of agriculture. Overall agriculture development strategy revolves to foster private sector-led development with public sector providing enabling environment through policy interventions and play capacity building role to improve agriculture related practices. The emphasis is on improving productivity and moving from subsistence to market oriented farming in the country to meet the domestic demand and surplus for export. The objective is to exploit potentials of our agriculture sector and use it as engine for economic growth and food......

Words: 9649 - Pages: 39

Report on Fishing

...Government of Uganda MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL INDUSTRY & FISHERIES DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES RESOURCES ANNUAL REPORT 2010/2011 Final Draft i Table of Contents LIST OF TABLES AND FIGURES ............................................................................................... iv LIST OF ACRONYMS ................................................................................................................... v FOREWORD .................................................................................................................................. vi EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ............................................................................................................. 1 1. INTRODUCTIONp .................................................................................................................. 4 1.1 Vision of DFR .................................................................................................................. 5 1.2 Mandate of DFR ............................................................................................................... 5 1.3 Functions of DFR ............................................................................................................. 5 1.4 Legal Policy and Institutional Framework ....................................................................... 6 2. CAPTURE FISHERIES ........................................................................................................... 7 2...

Words: 14382 - Pages: 58

Fishing Industry

...Impact of Bangladesh Fishing Industry on the Local Economy | Fishing in Bangladesh | Submitted By: 3/4/2014 | Table of Contents 1. Introduction--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------3 2. Bangladesh Economy and Fisheries Impact on their Economy-------------------------4 3.1. Current Situation of Bangladesh Economy----------------------------------------------4 3.2. Fisheries in Bangladesh----------------------------------------------------------------------4 3.3. Dried Fish in Bangladesh--------------------------------------------------------------------6 3.4. Frozen Fish Exports of Bangladesh-------------------------------------------------------7 3.5. Contribution of Shrimp Export Industry of Bangladesh-------------------------------8 3. Conclusion-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------10 4. References------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------11 Bangladesh Fishing Industry and its Impact on Local Economy 1. Introduction Fishing industry has made a great impact on Bangladesh in terms of their local economy as the results in various studies show excellent growth trends. Marine fisheries have made excellent contribution from 1970 to 1993 with an increasing trend of 28.2 percent. Marine fish production is expected from artisanal fishing areas including......

Words: 2969 - Pages: 12

Fishing

...353–370.   '(/*$'2 (7 $/ Anderson, J. L., and Q. S. W. Fong. 1997. Aquaculture and international trade. Aquaculture Economics & Management 1: 29–44. Asche, F., and S. Tveteras. 2000. On the relationship between aquaculture and reduction fisheries. Paper presented at the biennial meetings of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade held in Corvallis, Oregon, 10–14 July, 2000. Asche, F., and T. Bjorndal. 1999. Demand elasticities for fish: A review. Globefish Special Series No. 9. Rome: Food and Agrictulture Organization of the United Nations. Barg, U., and M. J. Phillips. 1997. Environment and sustainability. In Review of the State of World Aquaculture 1997. FAO Fisheries Circular 886. Rome: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Barlow, S. M. 2000. Fishmeal and fish oil: Sustainable feed ingredients for aquaculture. The Global Aquaculture Advocate 3 (2): 85–86. Barlow, S. M., and Pike, I. H. 2001. Sustainability of fish meal and oil supply. Paper presented at the Scottish Norwegian Marine Fish Farming conference, “Sustainable Future for Marine Fish Farming,” held at the University of Stirling, Scotland, June 14–15, 2001. BBC News. 2002. Infertility linked to mercury in seafood. Cited in WorldCatch News. . September 24, 2002; accessed February 20, 2003. Be, T. T., L. C. Dung, and D. Brennan. 1999. Environmental costs of shrimp culture in the rice-growing regions of the Mekong Delta. Aquaculture Economics & Management 3......

Words: 4402 - Pages: 18

Agriculture

...Agriculture, growth and poverty reduction This paper was produced by the Agriculture and Natural Resources Team of the UK Department for International Development (DFID) in collaboration with Anne Thomson of Oxford Policy Management, Oxford. The authors are grateful to the UK Food Group for their additional contributions and comments. The paper reflects work in progress towards the development of new thinking on agricultural policy in DFID. It does not necessarily reflect the views and policy of DFID. This (working/supporting) paper is intended to stimulate public discussion. It is not necessarily DFID or UK Government policy. October 2004 Contents Executive Summary...................................................................................................... 3 1. What is the issue? .................................................................................................... 4 2. Agriculture, growth and poverty – what we know of the relationship ............................ 5 2.1 The context – the state of world poverty............................................................... 5 2.2 Agriculture’s recent performance – a picture of mixed progress............................... 7 2.3 Agricultural growth and poverty reduction – the evidence....................................... 9 2.4 Understanding how increased agricultural productivity reduces poverty ................. 10 3. Emerging issues and questions................................................

Words: 10970 - Pages: 44

The Role of Agriculture in Nigeria’s Economic Growth

...Preliminary draft. Please do not quote nor cite. Comments welcome. The Role of Agriculture in Nigeria’s Economic Growth: A General Equilibrium Analysis Simeon Ehui Sector Leader, Sustainable Development Network World Bank Country Office, Nigeria (contact: sehui@worldbank.org) Marinos Tsigas U.S. International Trade Commission, Washington, DC June 28, 2009 Abstract Blessed with abundant land and water resources, Nigeria’s agricultural sector has a high potential for growth, but this potential is not being realized. Productivity is low and basically stagnant. Farming systems, which are mostly small in scale, are still predominantly subsistence-based and for the most part depend on the vagaries of the weather. Many agricultural policies have also been ineffective, either because they have been misguided, or because their impacts have been swamped by macro policies affecting inflation, exchange rates, and the cost of capital. Recognizing these challenges, the Federal Government of Nigeria has identified the modernization of the agricultural sector as a major priority. In this paper we have applied the Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP) framework to estimate the growth potential of agriculture in Nigeria. Our results show that although a 1% percent technological progress in the oil sector gives the largest welfare benefits in dollar terms ($142.72 million), when we abstract for size several food and agricultural sectors have a value that is higher than that for the oil......

Words: 3958 - Pages: 16

Mining and Agriculture on the South African Economy

...volhoubaarheid van die Suid Afrikaanse ekonomie en gemeenskappe Woorde: 2057 8. Bronnelys: * Adcorp Emplyment Index, February 2014 * Agri SA, Memorandum: Ten most challenging issues confronting agriculture, 25 February 2013 * Bloomberg, South African Mine Strikes to Cut Exports by 12.5 Billion Rand, 6 November 2012 * Dr. F. Liebenberg & Prof J. Kirsten. Statistics on farm labour in South Africa. University of Pretoria. 8 October 2013 * ‘In the pits’, The Economist, 25 August 2012, http://www.economist.com. * Ibid.; Kearney, L., ‘Mining and minerals in South Africa’, SouthAfrica.info, 9 August 2012, http://www.southafrica.info. * JunJie Wu, Land Use Changes: Economic, Social, and Environmental Impacts * Leon, P., ‘South African mining industry at the cross roads’, Address to African Mining Network, 14 July 2012, http://led.co.za. * Mining Weekly, Mine strikes cost SA R10 bn in lost production - Treasury, 25 October 2012. * National Planning Commission, National Development Plan - 2030, at 42 (see also 146). * Pocket Guide to South Africa, Rural development and Land reform, 2012/13, www.gov.za * PricewaterhouseCoopers, SA Mine: Highlighting trends in the South African mining industry, November 2012 * Statistics SA, Mining: Production and sales (preliminary), November 2012, p6, Table 2....

Words: 2413 - Pages: 10

Forestry of Ny

...examination of their individual ownership objectives and education about the forest habitat needs of wildlife in their area of the state. In light of the majority private ownership of forest lands in the state, it is fortunate that numerous sustainable forestry certification programs have developed over the past several years. Most of these initiatives build of the principles of forest sustainability originally outlined in the “Montreal Process”, and have developed into credible systems that generally involve third-party auditing and verification, and chain-of-custody procedures. The Montreal Process, and similar initiatives in other regions of the world, came in response to 1992 Earth Summit or United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED), where participants called upon all nations to ensure sustainable development, including the management of all types of forests. The sustainability guidelines, principles and criteria used in these systems all address conservation of biological diversity, maintenance of forest ecosystem health and vitality, conservation and maintenance of soil and water resources. The major programs operating in New York (by enrolled acreage) include the American Tree Farm System, Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI) and Forest Stewardship Council (FSC). Other, comparable, internationally-accepted certification programs include the Canadian Forest Standards program and Pan European Forest Certification System. Hundreds of thousands of......

Words: 4773 - Pages: 20

Agriculture

...Scenario of Agriculture in India Agriculture in India is a major economic sector and it creates plenty of employment opportunities as well. India agriculture has an extensive background which goes back to 10 thousand years. At present, in terms of agricultural production, the country holds the second position all over the world. In 2007, agriculture and other associated industries such as lumbering and forestry represented around 16.6% of the Gross Domestic Product of the country. In addition, the sector recruited about 52% of the entire manpower.  Regardless of the fact that there has been a gradual slump in its contribution to the gross domestic product of the country, India agriculture is currently the biggest industry in India. On the whole, it has a key role in the socioeconomic growth of the country.  In terms of agricultural contribution, the following states in India are the most developed states: • Punjab • Uttar Pradesh • Madhya Pradesh • Haryana • Bihar • Andhra Pradesh • Maharashtra • West Bengal All these states play a key role in the agrarian development of India. The total arable territory in India is 1,269,219 km2, which represents about 56.78% of the overall land zone of the country. Arable land in India is diminishing because of continuous strain from an ever-increasing number of inhabitants and growing urbanization. The overall water surface area of the country is 31440 km2 and the country experiences a mean......

Words: 2580 - Pages: 11

Forestry

...third parties. d. the government cannot easily estimate the optimal quantity of pollution. 10) All except one of these are the benefits derived from the effort at conserving the rainforest of Central and South America. a) Tourists (foreign and local) to see unspoiled rainforest b) Preservation of species diversity and pharmaceutical products from rainforest species c) Example of Coase’s theorem of rainforest conservation d) Bird watchers in North America see rear birds from rainforest 11) To achieve a more efficient equilibrium, protect the fishery ecosystem, and improve social benefits, society imposes the following measures except a) Fishery sales b) License fee c. Quota – individual transferable quota d. Sell fishing quota at auction 12). These are all determinants of economic growth except a. Capital accumulation. b. Technological progress or innovation. c. Efficiency d. Energy supply 13. Which of the following is the best response for the following statement? Ecological Economics introduce three additional factors into the study of environmental and natural resource economics. a. Energy supply b. Natural capital – supplies of land and natural resources c. Absorptive capacity of the environment for the waste product in industrial development. d. All of the above 14. Private markets fail to account for externalities because a. externalities don't occur in private markets. b. sellers include costs associated with......

Words: 1490 - Pages: 6

Philippine Forests and Forestry

... Philippine forests and forestry By FLORENCIO TAMESIS THE forest is perhaps the most valuable replaceable natural resource of the Philippines. As a source of raw materials and revenue to the Government, it can be managed to yield for a long time more than it does at present. The latest estimate on the extent of the vegetative soil cover of the Philippines is as follows: | Area in Hectares | Percent | Commercial forest | 13,198,406 | 44.5 | Noncommercial forest | 4,296,786 | 14.4 | Marsh: | | | Fresh | 168,657 | | Salt | 438,155 | | | 606,812 | 2.0 | Open grassland | 5,203,620 | 17.5 | Cultivated | 6,434,348 | 21.6 | Total | 29,740,972 | 100.0 | Approximately 97.5 percent of the forest is owned by the Government and is administered by the Bureau of Forestry; 2.5 percent is privately owned. The greater bulk of the forest is in large blocks on the principal islands such as Luzon, Mindanao, Samar, Negros, and Palawan. Most of the forest is of the tropical rain type, complex in its composition. More than 3,000 species of trees attain a diameter of 30 centimeters (one foot) or more; however, less than sixty of these are marketed. Seventy-five percent of the stand consists of dipterocarps, commonly called lauan, to which "Philippine mahogany" belongs. It is conservatively estimated that the aggregate commercial standing timber is around 2,105,000,000 m3 ® (464,729,000,000 bd. ft.). Based on forest charges (government stumpage tax), this stand has a value of......

Words: 7731 - Pages: 31

Fishing Style

...along latitude 6°15’5” North, and longitude 125°39’57” East and the original name is “lawa”. The fishing distance from the shoreline is estimated about 600- 800 m. Fishery Profile of Don Marcelino Davao del Sur Don Marcelino Davao del Sur has a fifteen barangays in a total land area of 40.73 (km2) according to the LGU. Out of fifteen barangays, ten are coastal barangays; Cali-an, Kinanga, Kiobog, Lanao, Lapuan, Lawa, Linadasan, North Lamidan, South Lamidan, and Talagutong. The total coastline of Don Marcelino is 46.8 km and has a total number of 8,980 fishermen in 1,821 fishing families. 15 15 Fig.1.1 Map of Don Marcelino Davao del Sur Construction of the Gear Troll line will be assembled with four rolls (#80) monocline nylon that will serve as the mainline. Mainline measures 20/25 meters in length. Branch lines will use (#40) monocline nylon. It will measure about 5 meters in length with hook at the end. Each line will have the specific hook sizes connected (#12-13, #14, #16, #18) and will be attached into the swivel. 16 16 COLOR BLUE/WHITE LURE LURE/BAIT COLOR BLUE/WHITE LURE LURE/BAIT Fig.1.2 Illustration of the Gear Gear Operation Gear operation will be done using a motorized boat. The researcher will be considering the specific fishing ground such as “kanaway” when operate the fishing gear during morning and afternoon. Fishing operation will be conducted 4 days for 1 to 2 hours. The line will be towed close to the......

Words: 1376 - Pages: 6

Agriculture

............... 66 ____________________________________________________________ ____________ iii Agricultural Marketing and Supply Chain Management in Tanzania: A Case Study 1.0 INTRODUCTION Tanzania’s economy is heavily dependent on agricultural production. In 2003 agriculture accounted for half of the country’s GDP, provided 51 percent of foreign exchange and employed 80 percent of the labour force (Agricultural Marketing Policy 2005). Selling agricultural products is the main source of cash income for most rural households. Even though the heavy dependence on agriculture is seen as a hindrance for rapid growth, and structural change is needed in the long run, the dominant role of agriculture is not likely to change in the near future. Thus the government has recently started targeting agricultural reforms as the quickest way to reduce poverty. In late 2001 the government produced the Agricultural Sector Development Strategy (ASDS) that aims to provide the basis for the rural sector of the economy to become an engine of growth, leading to a substantial reduction of poverty. This goal is also discussed in the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP) of 2000, where growth in agriculture was set as one of the pillars for achieving medium term targets for poverty reduction. The focus of the discussion on the agricultural sector as a source of wealth and livelihood has traditionally been on production. However, in recent years looking at agricultural marketing has......

Words: 27148 - Pages: 109

Japan

...Cultural Perspectives of Japan William Earl Barnes Jr. Abstract Japan is an island country sited east of the mainland of Asia. It is made up of a long, slender group of islands. The four main islands are Honshu (the largest), Hokkaido, Kyushu, and Shikoku. There are more than three thousand smaller islands. Together, they have about the identical land area as the state of California. Across the Sea of Japan to its north and west are Russia and South Korea. To the east, where the sun rises, Japan borders the Pacific Ocean. The Japanese call their nation Nippon, which means “Land of the Rising Sun” Japan has a remarkable landscape. Mountains and hills cover most of the land. A chain of mountains runs down the middle of Japan. Snow-capped Mount Fuji, Japan’s highest peak, towers over Honshu Island. Swift streams flow from the mountains into the sea. Thick forests cover the mountainsides where deer and monkeys make their homes in the spring; the countryside is colored pink and white with the blossoms of plum and cherry trees. In southern Japan, summers are long and hot. In the north, winters are cold and snowy. Central Japan has an enjoyable climate, with warm summers and cool winters. The country is often shaken by volcanic explosions and earthquakes. Japan’s first powerful rulers were chiefs from the Yamato region. During the Yamatos’ rule, many visitors from other lands came to Japan. Scholars from china brought the Chinese writing system in the 400s. They also......

Words: 3523 - Pages: 15