Analysis Common Sense

In: Novels

Submitted By amcgirr
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Common Sense states “government is a necessary evil” today, government runs everything everywhere. It contradicts the British government and beliefs while Britain was controlling the old English colonies. Thomas Paine was English born but had an American soul. His influence and ideas had a large impact on him as a person and our country. His influence did not only affect history but is still in use today. As stated in Common Sense, the American colonies would be better off as a society instead of a government. Society meaning, a group of actual colonist coming together to follow a set of rules without crime or victimizing. The government can often be pushy and not allow civilians of society to speak or think for themselves. The British government in a way, suffocated the colonies from being individuals and ruling themselves. Thomas Paine stated in his book that the government was like a King. He talked about religions choosing a king to rule over them instead of having their own people and God make their decisions. This is how government started to form. He states that God is unhappy with the decision, but provides their King anyway. Thomas Paine was born in Norfolk, England in 1737. He was born as a Quaker (“A Biography of Thomas Paine”). A Quaker is a person who follows a group of religious followers and servers. This group was often found persuading equal rights especially when slavery and women’s’ rights were an issue (“History of Quakers”). Thomas was born under Britain rule, but during this time the groups of Quakers were becoming stronger. Thomas stood up to his government and moved to American in 1774. Thomas was unsuccessful in England but was determined to inform people in America of his beliefs about society and the British government. He participated in the rebellion during the Boston Tea Party and the battles fought in Lexington and Concord. He…...

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