Biochemical

In: Science

Submitted By Pr1990
Words 334
Pages 2
Kenneth Thornton
1. The thesis statement of the article is “Science is a way of thinking much more than a body of knowledge.” I believe it is an implied statement. The statement is implied because it doesn’t fit the other descriptions, as well as, it is implying what science is that it is more that a body of knowledge.
2. * The question of gravity being wrong for so many years until Galileo * Human curiosity about things that can’t be explained by simple thought. * Our perception of things can be screwed and we must think more about questions than the answers.
3. The evidence of gravity not being known or questioned until Galileo. The Special Theory of Relativity by Albert Einstein is an example. The grain of salt being so small that our brain can’t comprehend mathematically speaking.
I believe all are relevant and far as I can tell accurate.
4. The persona of the author was friendly and knowledgeable. I think he wasn’t overbearing in big words and the article was written well so he seems like a good, smart person. He sounds like he knows what he is talking about.
5. If anything the style on how he wrote the article made me like him more. I also have a bias on the information given.
6. Pathos may have been present in the article I just didn’t get a feel from it in that way. He engaged by using very good examples of how things are relative to each other.
7. The author used language I could understand for the most part so I he played to my smart side if anything. I think the language is used fairly.
8. If the question means actual visuals then no, there was only a picture of man that was not needed. If the question is about his language and him making me visualize certain things like the grain of salt and its atoms then yes there were plenty of them and very exciting…...

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