Biology Laboratory

In: Science

Submitted By valwinckelmann
Words 1222
Pages 5
U.E Academia Washington
Asignatura: Biología
Componente: Laboratorio
Convocatoria: 25/02/2013

PRÁCTICA DE LABORATORIO 1
Objetivo: determinar la sensibilidad de la piel con el sistema de la doble estimulación. Clasificar la sensibilidad a la presión por áreas de la piel.

Valeria Winckelmann
24.311.791

Obtención y procesamiento de datos:

Tabla #1: Datos brutos

REGIÓN DEL CUERPO | LADO DERECHO mm (±1mm) | LADO IZQUIERDO mm (±1mm) | Mejillas | 10 | 14 | | 12 | 12 | | 12 | 14 | Palmas de la mano | 4 | 6 | | 4 | 4 | | 6 | 4 | Hombros | 8 | 12 | | 6 | 8 | | 10 | 10 | Planta del pie | 4 | 6 | | 4 | 4 | | 4 | 4 | Espalda baja | 10 | 14 | | 10 | 10 | | 8 | 12 |

Gráfica #1: Datos Brutos

Media:

Mejillas:

* Lado derecho:
Media= 10+12+12 3
Media= 11.33 mm

* Lado izquierdo:
Media= 14+12+14 3
Media= 13.33 mm

Palmas de la mano:

* Lado derecho: Media= 4+4+6 3
Media= 4.67 mm

* Lado izquierdo:
Media= 6+4+4 3
Media= 4.67mm

Hombros:

* Lado derecho:
Media= 8+6+10 3
Media= 8mm

* Lado izquierdo:
Media= 12+8+10 3
Media= 10mm

Planta del pie:

* Lado derecho:
Media= 4+4+4 3
Media= 4mm

* Lado izquierdo:
Media= 6+4+4 3 Media= 4.67mm

Espalda baja: * Lado derecho:
Media= 10+10+8 3
Media= 9.33mm

* Lado izquierdo:
Media= 14+10+12 3
Media= 12mm

Tabla #2: media de las medidas Región del cuerpo | Lado derecho mm (±1mm) | Lado izquierdo mm (±1mm) | 1. Mejillas | 11.33 | 13.33 | 2. Palmas de la mano | 4.67 | 4.67 | 3.Hombros | 8 | 10 | 4. Plantas del pie | 4 | 4.67 | 5. Espalda baja | 9.33 | 12 |

Gráfica…...

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