Chalon

In: English and Literature

Submitted By saleemFML
Words 688
Pages 3
Chalon
A few years ago I went to a restaurant called Chalon and as I was walking to the door I saw it said 'Authentic Japanese Restaurant.' This started to make me think about sushi, sashimi and all the other raw food. As I opened the door I was asked how many people were eating, since it was only 6:30pm, there weren't a lot of people there. As we were walking to our seats I was wondering why nobody was eating any sushi or sashimi. Then we were given our menus and I realized that they don't sell any sushi! This was the reason I chose this restaurant. How could Chalon call itself an authentic Japanese restaurant when they don't even sell sushi?

Chalon is a family restaurant, which means crying babies and whining children. The quiet atmosphere completely changed at 7:00pm. People started to flow into Chalon and there were 2 or 3 babies crying for at least half an hour. Outside a line of 20 people was growing longer by the minute. Chalon provides quiet and slow jazz music and the lighting was bright.

Even though it said that Chalon was an authentic Japanese restaurant, you could order western and Korean food. The menu was separated into entrée's, Korean, Japanese, Western and desserts and salad. There was also a separate children's menu which they gave to my friend who they thought was a child but was actually 1 year older than me but just shorter.

The Japanese food was mainly you-don noodles; Korean was mainly rice and the western food was grilled meat. I ordered the Korean stone rice, which consists of rice, beef, vegetables, raw egg in a stone bowl, which was extraordinarily hot. Such a big bowl of food was only $48, which is quite cheap. I had to wait a minute or two before the food had become cool enough to actually eat. It tasted relatively excellent, and the Kim-chi provided a spicy savor to it. My companion had ordered ribs which also came with…...

Similar Documents

Atilla the Hun

...When Valentinian heard of this, he wrote to Attila strenuously denying the legitimacy of the supposed marriage proposal. Attila sent an emissary to Ravenna to proclaim that Honoria was innocent, that the proposal had been legitimate, and that he would come to claim what was rightfully his.23 On April 7, he captured Metz and attacked various other cities along the way. Aëtius moved to oppose Attila, gathering troops from among the Franks, the Burgundians, and the Celts. A mission by Avitus, and Attila's continued westward advance, convinced the Visigoth king Theodoric I to ally with the Romans. The combined armies reached Orleans ahead of Attila, thus checking and turning back the Hunnish advance. The two armies clashed in the Battle of Chalons, whose outcome is commonly considered to be a strategic victory for the Visigothic-Roman alliance. Theodoric I was killed in the fighting and Aëtius failed to press his advantage because he feared the consequences of an overwhelming Visigothic triumph as much as he did a defeat.24 Attila retreated, but he did not do so willing. The only thing that made him do so was the fact that he knew he did not stand a chance. With this in mind, he and the Huns went back and kept quiet for some time. Then, Attila returned in 452 to reclaim his marriage to Honoria.25 Along the way, he invaded and ravaged Italy. The city of Venice was founded as a result of these attacks when the residents fled to small islands in the Venetian Lagoon. His army......

Words: 3166 - Pages: 13

The Innocence of Marie Antoinette

...his kingdom and escape from the clutches of his political enemies. The diplomatic intrigues that went on behind the scenes are more interesting than any imaginary romance. (The queen’s relationship with her husband is more interesting as well.) However, books and movies continue to add this sensationalism to the queen’s life, as if anything could be more sensational than the reality. Serious modern and contemporary scholars, however, such as Paul and Pierrette Girault de Coursac, Hilaire Belloc, Nesta Webster, Simone Bertière, Philippe Delorme, Jean Chalon, Desmond Seward, and Simon Schama are unanimous in saying that there is no conclusive evidence to prove that Marie-Antoinette violated her marriage vows by dallying with Count Fersen. As Jean Chalon points out in his biography Chère Marie-Antoinette, Fersen, who had many mistresses, saw the queen as an angel, to whom he offered reverent and chaste homage. According to Chalon, Marie-Antoinette knew about sex only through conjugal love, where she found her “happiness,” her bonheur essentiel, as she wrote to her mother. If there had been any cause for concern about Count Fersen’s presence at the French court as regards the queen’s reputation, the Austrian ambassador Count Mercy-Argenteau would surely have mentioned it in one of the reams of letters to Marie-Antoinette’s mother Empress Maria Teresa, to whom he passed on every detail of the young queen’s life. Count Mercy had spies whom he paid well to gather information, but...

Words: 1229 - Pages: 5

Commuinication Media

...Health Care Communication Methods DeAndrea Wheeler HCS/320 June 11, 2013 Chalon Washington As the Communication Coordinator for this well known drug manufacturer, we will now debate and discus how we will get information to the public about the negative effects that our medications are causing the public. Our goal, as a vital asset to the public and medical community, is to convey all concerns to our community in a very sensitive and careful way. Using the power of newspapers, radio, internet, social networking and news related companies. The local news has already reported that a well-known public figure has been effected which goes against the health portability and accountability act. So as communication coordinator it is important to communicate this issue carefully, addressing the proper population, without losing business and the trust we created with our investors and consumers. Today in our meeting, we will discuss very important aspects of our company’s medical concerns and deciding which communication tactic is most suitable for this situation, while sticking to the very important and necessary HIPPAA guidelines. We will start by discussing the advantages and disadvantages of using traditional media, to get the news out to a significant number of the population. Recent reports of negative effects caused by one of the company’s medications need to be addressed. News reports have alleged that one of the individuals is a well-known public figure. Traditional......

Words: 1397 - Pages: 6

Product Ex

...after contact) polycarbonate, polyurethane, silicone, polysulfone, polyamide, polyester, polystyrene Interactions Avoid the mixing of gigasept® PAA with other products (cleaner, disinfectants), particularly with aldehydes or derivates of halogens (e.g. glutaral, sodium hypochlorite, etc.) Labelling according to EC directives 39/I/07/10/B/Rako – This product information is not automatically updated. Schülke & Mayr Ges.m.b.H Seidengasse 9 1070 Wien, Austria Phone +43 (0) 1- 523 25 01 - 0 Fax +43 (0) 1- 523 25 01 - 60 office@schuelke.at Xi Irritant. R41: Risk of serious damage to eyes. S26: In case of contact with eyes, rinse immediately with plenty of water and seek medical advice. S39: Wear eye/face protection. BIOXAL SA, 71100 Chalon sur Saône, France Schülke & Mayr GmbH 22840 Norderstedt, Germany Phone +49 (0) 40 - 521 00 - 0 Schülke & Mayr GmbH is certified according to DIN EN ISO 9001, DIN EN ISO 14001 Fax +49 (0) 40 - 521 00 - 318 and DIN EN ISO 13485 (Reg.-No. 004567-MP23) and has a validated environmental www.schuelke.com system in accordance with the Eco Audit Regulation (Reg.-No. DE-150-00003). mail@schuelke.com Schülke & Mayr UK Ltd. 1 Jenkin Road GB-Sheffield S9 1AT Phone +44 (0) 1142 - 54 35 - 00 Fax +44 (0) 1142 - 54 35 - 01 mail.uk@schuelke.com ...

Words: 764 - Pages: 4

Atomoxetine

...effects such as vasoconstriction and acceleration of heart rate and result in tachycardia and dysrhythmias. Pharmacokinetics Atomoxetine is dosed according to weights of patients (Saucer et al., 2005). It is orally administered with fine absorption, bioavailability = 0.63 and 0.94 for extensive metaboliser (EM) and poor metaboliser (PM) respectively (Saucer et al., 2005), with maximum plasma concentration achieved after 2 to 3 hours (Allen et al., 2004). Once-daily dosing in the morning can be as effective as twice-daily dosing in EM with its effect last to evening and the next morning (Allen et al., 2004), and it is convenient for the patients. Atomoxetine has high plasm protein binding affinity, 98.7% and 96.5% EM and PM respectively (Chalon et al., 2003), so administration with high protein foods may decrease absorption rate. It is then metabolised by Cytochrome P450 in liver. Oxidising atomoxetine to its major metabolite 4-hydroxyatomoxetine by Cyp2D6 is phase I metabolism, with some N-desmethylatomoxetine also observed (Long et al., 2003). Therefore, its metabolism pathway encounters polymorphism with the bimodal population distribution grouped into EM and PM. There are around 7% of Caucasian and 1% of Asian that are poor metabolisers related to Cyp2D6 (Long et al., 2003). In EM 4-hydroxyatomoxetine further undergoes phase II metabolism to 4-hydrosyatomoxetine-O-glucuronide. However, this metabolite has lower concentration in PM with pharmacologically inactive......

Words: 1526 - Pages: 7

Chhi 301 Papacy Paper

...increased the power of the Church even more. Through his educational reforms, he was responsible for the Carolingian Reformation. Although the Holy Roman Empire was not formally established until one century after Charlemagne’s reign, it took root in the title he adopted for himself, “Charles, most serene Augustus, crowned by God, great and pacific emperor, governing the Roman Empire.” The effects of barbarism rescinded as education spread across Europe. If it were not for him and the Roman Catholic Church, Western Europe would not have survived and would possibly still be a barbaric continent today. Charlemagne was responsible, even after his death, for the opening of schools through local councils such as the Synod of Bavaria, Council of Chalons, and Council of Aix. Yet the church, ironically enough, became more barbaric in its use of power. The corruption in the church led to reforms in the monasteries around 910, specifically in a monastery called Cluny in France, where monks placed themselves under the power of the pope to evade the grasp of the lords. Over a period of one hundred and fifty years, their reforms spread over monasteries all across Europe, and they are now known as Cluniacs. In Germany, reform was also happening as emperors allied with bishops to prevent lords from controlling church lands. Emperor Henry III even appointed four reform popes, one of whom, Leo IX, ordered several reforms against simony (selling of church offices), clerical marriage,......

Words: 1695 - Pages: 7

Computer History

...amusing origin of the name dynamic programming, which was EUGÈNE CHARLES CATALAN (1814–1894) Eugène Catalan was born in Bruges, then part of France. His father became a successful architect in Paris while Eugène was a boy. Catalan attended a Parisian school for design hoping to follow in his father’s footsteps. At 15, he won the job of teaching geometry to his design school classmates. After graduating, Catalan attended a school for the fine arts, but because of his mathematical aptitude his instructors recommended that he enter the École Polytechnique. He became a student there, but after his first year, he was expelled because of his politics. However, he was readmitted, and in 1835, he graduated and won a position at the Collège de Châlons sur Marne. In 1838, Catalan returned to Paris where he founded a preparatory school with two other mathematicians, Sturm and Liouville. After teaching there for a short time, he was appointed to a position at the École Polytechnique. He received his doctorate from the École Polytechnique in 1841, but his political activity in favor of the French Republic hurt his career prospects. In 1846 Catalan held a position at the Collège de Charlemagne; he was appointed to the Lycée Saint Louis in 1849. However, when Catalan would not take a required oath of allegiance to the new Emperor Louis-Napoleon Bonaparte, he lost his job. For 13 years he held no permanent position. Finally, in 1865 he was appointed to a chair of mathematics at the......

Words: 460928 - Pages: 1844

Photography

...20 to 30 minutes. Louis died July 10, 1851. On Jan. 9, 1839, announced at a meeting of the Academy of Sciences by the eminent astronomer and physicist François Arago, a full description of his daguerreotype process was presented. Daguerre was appointed an officer of the Legion of Honour. The distinguishing visual characteristics of a daguerreotype are that the image is on a bright (ignoring any areas of tarnish) mirror-like surface of metallic silver and depending on the lighting conditions it will appear either positive or negative, and whether a light or dark background is being reflected in the metal. From certain angles the image cannot be seen at all. Joseph Nieppe Joseph-Nicéphore Niépce was born on March 7th , 1765 in Chalon-sur-Saône, France. Joseph was a French inventor who was the first to make a permanent photographic image. He died on July 5, 1833. Nieppe and his brother Claude invented an internal-combustion engine in 1807. They called this the Pyreolophore. They explained that the word was a combination of Greek words, they used such as “fire” “wind and “I produce.” It was not until 1813 where lithography became a hobby where they lived in France. He then began to experiment with the then-novel printing technique. Nieppe was unskilled in drawing, and unable to obtain proper lithographic stone locally, however he sought a way to provide images automatically. He coated pewter with various light-sensitive substances in an effort to copy superimposed...

Words: 1017 - Pages: 5

Dscrete Mathmetic

...amusing origin of the name dynamic programming, which was EUGÈNE CHARLES CATALAN (1814–1894) Eugène Catalan was born in Bruges, then part of France. His father became a successful architect in Paris while Eugène was a boy. Catalan attended a Parisian school for design hoping to follow in his father’s footsteps. At 15, he won the job of teaching geometry to his design school classmates. After graduating, Catalan attended a school for the fine arts, but because of his mathematical aptitude his instructors recommended that he enter the École Polytechnique. He became a student there, but after his first year, he was expelled because of his politics. However, he was readmitted, and in 1835, he graduated and won a position at the Collège de Châlons sur Marne. In 1838, Catalan returned to Paris where he founded a preparatory school with two other mathematicians, Sturm and Liouville. After teaching there for a short time, he was appointed to a position at the École Polytechnique. He received his doctorate from the École Polytechnique in 1841, but his political activity in favor of the French Republic hurt his career prospects. In 1846 Catalan held a position at the Collège de Charlemagne; he was appointed to the Lycée Saint Louis in 1849. However, when Catalan would not take a required oath of allegiance to the new Emperor Louis-Napoleon Bonaparte, he lost his job. For 13 years he held no permanent position. Finally, in 1865 he was appointed to a chair of mathematics at the......

Words: 459343 - Pages: 1838

Case Study

...Dear Student, To assist you all in preparing your financial documents, please read through the following: Start preparing these documents once your admission is confirmed. 1 You must show as liquid assets to the tune of sum total of the amount =Tuition fees + living expenses 2 Living expense amount is calculated as 500 – 700 Euros*no of months of stay depending on the size (small / medium size town or city like Chalon-sur-Saône – big city like Paris) of the place where you are going to stay in France 3 Tuition fees are generally to be paid in installments. (The amount and periodicity of payment varies from institute to institute) 4 Amongst the documents of financial proof: • Affidavit of support on a stamp paper attested by a first class magistrate / notary public. This sponsorship may be from father/ mother/ both / relative. This statement is worded as follows (for example): |To whomsoever it may concern | |I Mr. Name of sponsor pledge to bear the financial responsibility to the tune of Rs _________(write in | |numerals and do not use the word “lacs” the French do not understand it) towards Mr/Miss your name’s higher| |education in France. | | | |Signature of deponent or sponsor...

Words: 589 - Pages: 3

International Trade

...Duisbourg : 49,2 +6%, Rotterdam : 35 mt +8% ➢ Nombre de bateaux par pays en 2004 : Pays-Bas : 4898, Allemagne : 2.422, Belgique - Luxembourg : 1.606, France : 1505, Suisse : 44 ➢ Capacité de port en lourd en tonnes en 2004 : Pays-Bas : 5.912.000 T, Allemagne : 2.700.000 T, Belgique et Luxembourg : 1.845.000 T, France : 1.100.000 T, Suisse : 102.100 T 144 Les principaux ports intérieurs français ✓ Strasbourg : en 2004 le port a traité 8,65 MT (+5,7%) dont 0,591 MT en conteneur (+56%) soit 139.954 TEU’s (+15,9%) dont 61.390 TEU’s en fluvial (+13,2%) ✓ Lille : en 2004 le port a traité 7,7 MT (+5,34%) dont 1,08 MT en fluvial (+11,2%) avec 88.093 TEU’s (+18,84%) dont 39.319 TEU’s en fluvial (+24,17%) ✓ Approport : Chalon sur Saone + Macon : en 2004 le port a traité 3,5 MT (+14,00%) dont 1,32 MT en fluvial (+16%) avec 51.863 TEU’s (+4%) dont 10.583 TEU’s en fluvial (+1%) ✓ Mulhouse : en 2004 le port a traité 9,15 MT (+11,14%) dont 6,1 MT en fluvial (+11,45%) avec 239.858 TEU’s (+34,4%) dont 113.764 TEU’s en fluvial (+38,2%) ✓ Paris : en 2004 le port a traité 19,60 MT (-0,8%) en fluvial avec 193.590 TEU’s dont 59.296 TEU’s en fluvial (+30%) 145 Pré et post-acheminement fluvial à 44 tonnes Le décret qui autorise, par voie de modification du code de la route (Article R 312-4) la circulation à 44 tonnes des véhicules de transport routier de marchandises effectuant des pré et post acheminements vers ou depuis un port ou un site......

Words: 49583 - Pages: 199

Weapons

...Aetius won over the Huns at the battle of Chalons in 451 is a good example. Realizing the need to stop the penetration of the Huns, led by Attila, further into Western Europe—they had most recently been besieging Orléans— Aetius used a personal bond of friendship and the fear of further incursions by the Huns in the west to make peace with the Visigoths in southeastern France and northern Spain. He then enticed them to join his army, an army composed of Alans, Ostrogoths, Visigoths, 5 6 MEDIEVAL WEAPONS Vandals, and even some Huns, although apparently few Romans. They were, however, supplied with Roman arms and armor. Aetius established a strong defensive position on terrain unfavorable to cavalry warfare and provoked his overly confident enemy to attack him. It became an infantry-on-infantry battle, much to the disadvantage of the cavalry-dominant Huns, who nevertheless fought with their customary spirit. In the end, the Romans and Visigoths prevailed, and Attila’s conquest of Western Europe was halted. Had Aetius not used his own barbarian-filled forces, made an alliance with other barbarians, or known of his enemy barbarians’ tactics, the battle of Chalons might have gone Attila’s way, and the history of Europe would have been vastly changed. What this means is that it is difficult to know exactly when the military of Western Europe ceased being “Roman” and became “barbarian.” Certainly by the time of Chalons, the Roman army could no longer be......

Words: 118320 - Pages: 474

Dictionary of the Media

...on the power press in the UK was Johann Blumenbach’s Physiology, in 1817. 1821 In Britain, the Six Acts passed, including two targeting the radical press. • Manchester Guardian founded. 1822 Invention of the camera by Frenchman Joseph Nièpce who produced the first photograph (1826). Also in 1822, William Church’s letter-founding machine makes for reductions in production costs. Hand-assembly could cast between 3,000 and 7,000 letters a day, Church’s machine between 12,000 and 20,000. • Sunday Times founded. 1826 Leipzig publisher F.A. Brockhaus applies Koenig’s steam press to the printing of books. • First permanently fixed photograph created by Nicéphore Nièpce. This was taken from an upper storey at Nièpce’s home at Gras, Chalon-surSaône. 1829 Four-cylinder steam press, invented by 1830s – 1848 Augustus Applegarth and Edward Cowper for The Times, speeds the delivery of print, allowing 4,000 sheets per hour. The same inventors follow this up in 1848 with the rotary press, which printed 8,000 sheets per hour. 1830s UK: the ‘War of the Unstamped’ waged by the radical, unstamped press against the Taxes on Knowledge. 1831–5 Publication of Henry Hetherington’s Poor Man’s Guardian, one of the outstanding radical papers of the nineteenth century. 1832 W.E. Weber and K.F. Gauss construct the needle telegraph in Grottingen. • The Penny Magazine of London becomes the first mass-circulation paper selling over 100,000 copies. 1833 Advertising Duty......

Words: 270226 - Pages: 1081

The Fall of the Imperialist Roman Empire

...a devastating flood the Huns swept over Gaul, leaving behind them a track of blood and ashes. Town after town was given to the flames, and the fair fields were laid waste. Then, at length, forgetting their old quarrels, Roman and Goth joined to crush the common foe. The Goths, under King Theodoric, and the Romans under Aëtius, "the last of the Romans," marched northward. Franks and Burgundians, too, joined the army, and upon a plain near Chalons a great battle was fought between the allies and the Hun. The struggle was long and fierce. Theodoric, king of the Visigoths, was slain, but in the end the Huns were defeated. Defeated they were, but not crushed. Like a wounded animal behind the rampart of his baggage wagons, Atilla crouched, growling and watchful. So dangerous he seemed that the allies dared no more attack him, and content with their victory, they marched homeward. This fight has been called the battle of the Nations. And although the victory was not a decisive one, a great question was settled upon the field of Chalons. There it was made plain that Europe was to be the heritage of the Christian Teutons and Romans, and not of the pagan Mongols. Attila was too crippled to renew the fight, and sullenly he recrossed the Rhine. But the following year, having gathered another army, he marched through Italy, leaving, as was his wont, a trail of ruined cities and devastated plains in his wake. "The decline of Rome was the natural and inevitable effect of......

Words: 2526 - Pages: 11

Economy Theory

...between these two places. Assume that, every year, the city of Châlons-sur-Marne134 pays 10,000 ounces of silver to the king’s tax collector, and wine merchants from Châlons and the surrounding areas sell to Paris, through their distributors, Champagne wine for a total of 10,000 ounces of silver. If the ounce of silver is worth five livres in France, the 10,000 ounces in question will be worth 50,000 livres in both Paris and Châlons. The tax collector, in this example, has 50,000 livres to send to Paris, and the distributors have 50,000 livres to send to Châlons’ wine merchants. This double transaction, or transport, may be avoided by an exchange contract known as bills of exchange, if the parties get together and arrange for it. In this example, let each wine distributor take his portion of the 50,000 livres to the cashier of the tax collector’s office in Paris and in return he will be given a check or bill of exchange payable to the Châlons’ tax collector. When these checks are endorsed and transferred to the Châlons’ tax office, the tax obligations of the Châlons’ wine merchants of 50,000 livres will be paid. In this manner, the 50,000 livres in Paris will be paid to the cashier of the tax department in Paris and the wine merchants of Châlons will, in effect, be paid, and by this exchange or offset, the trouble of sending this money from one city to the other is avoided. Or else, let Châlons’ wine merchants, who have 50,000 livres in Paris, offer bills......

Words: 66839 - Pages: 268