Clement Dna Exonerations and Race

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Submitted By bean011
Words 648
Pages 3
DNA Exonerations and Race
Thomas ******
**** College
Course:****
Dr. *** **** October 18, 2015

. Originally I planned on doing my paper on African Americans and the death penalty. After doing research for a few days it hit me that there was a whole other topic that I should be doing. Under most instances I support the death penalty but I came across an article that gave an opinion that all death penalty inmates should have their evidence reexamined and DNA tested if they were convicted in a pre DNA era. After that I looked into the statistics of people that had been exonerated after serving years in prison by reexamining the DNA from their cases. I was amazed that there had been so many people exonerated out with such limited resources. I now knew that I wanted to know more about DNA exonerations what the statistics were with race and those wrongfully convicted. I think the two subjects African Americans and the death penalty and DNA exonerations could be really enlightening as it shows that the American Justice System in the past surely has executed wrongfully convicted men in the past. So I used Google to search “Exonerated by DNA and Race” and began to read not only their cases but also their stories. The next day I was already questioning my stance on the death penalty. Not only did I think about how their lives will never be the same I thought about all the time they lost and can never get back. Time stood still for them while their families, friends, and loved ones moved on with their lives likely never expecting to see them on that side of their lives again. I sat there and thought how many men have been wrongfully convicted for crimes they didn’t commit and had no one to believe in them or their innocence to help set them free. Many of them no longer have hope and certainly don’t have much trust in the Justice System…...

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