Cultural Dimensions at Work

In: Business and Management

Submitted By abdir001
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Discussion: Hofstede’s Research and CWQ Results Geert was the founder and head of the personnel research department at IBM Europe from 1965 – 1971. In his research, he deployed a survey on a large scale regarding national value differences present across the worldwide subsidiaries of IBM. After collecting the data, he studied and compared the results of thousands of company employees on the same altitude survey in different nations and regions. His analysis of his research’s findings revealed systematic differences in national cultures on four primary dimensions: power distance (PDI), individualism (IDV), uncertainty avoidance (UAI) and masculinity (MAS). In 1991, Michael Harris Bond, another researcher and his colleagues developed and administered a survey among students in 23 countries by using a survey instrument co-created with Chinese employees and managers. The results from this survey led Hofstede to add a new fifth dimension to his model: long term orientation (LTO). In order to gain a better understanding of the theory, I took the ITAP questionnaire to explore my own ideal view of culture in the workplace and how it compares to five other different countries/regions (Malaysia, Canada, Switzerland, East Africa and Brazil) that I pick for my interest. The results were then analyzed by using the cultural dimensions from Hofstede’s research.
Power distance index (PDI): Power distance reflects the range of answers found in the various countries to the basic question of how to handle the fact that people are unequal. By using this index, countries can be distinguished by the way they tend to deal with inequalities (Hofstede, Minkov...Page 55). I scored less than 50 on a scale of 1-100 which means I have a preference for more of a participative orientation. My score in the low to the middle range of this dimension indicate I generally expect superior –…...

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