Describe and Evaluate Cultural Variations in Attatchment

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Describe and evaluate cultural variations in attachments.

Attachment is an affectional bond that one person or animal forms between itself and another specific individual, for example a child and its mother.
Attachment has been said to vary depending on different cultures.A test was conducted by Ainsworth & Bell (1970) on the attachment on children. 100 middle-class American infants and their mothers took part in the study. A method of controlled observation was developed. This involved observing infants with their mother during a set of predetermined activities, known as the strange situation. Firstly, the mother and child are introduced to the room. The mother and child are left alone and the child can investigate the toys. A stranger then enters the room and talks with the mother. The stranger gradually approaches the infant with a toy. The mother leaves the child alone with the stranger, and the stranger interacts with the child. The mother returns to greet and comfort the child. The child is left on its own, the stranger then returns and tries to engage with the child. Finally the mother returns, greets and picks up the child. The stranger then leaves inconspicuously.This test was conducted to observe children’s attachment with their mothers. The Findings showed that 66% of the children were securely attached. This was shown as the infants tended to explore the unfamiliar room; they were distressed when their mother left and were easily comforted when she returned. The infants displayed moderate avoidance of the stranger, although were friendly when the mother was present.22% of the infants were classed as avoidant-insecure. These infants did not orientate to their mother while investigating the toys and room; they did not seem concerned by her absence and showed little interest in her when she returned. These infants also avoided the stranger,…...

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