Describe and Evaluate the Key Elements of Frederick Taylor's Approach to 'Scientific Management' and Comment on Its Applicability in Contemporary Organisations

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Describe and evaluate the key elements of Frederick Taylor's approach to 'scientific management' and comment on its applicability in contemporary organizations (You might select a particular industry or occupational area for this analysis).

Scientific management is involved with rationalization and labor-control methods whereby production systems will involve both people and machines in order to improve efficiency. In most countries, the natural resources are seen to vanish with no action being taken against people responsible for depleting these resources. Most people argue that they lack professionals who can handle such instances well. Why should a whole nation wait for someone to emerge from nowhere and take control of their resources while they can manage it themselves? Past ideologies that people could become managers and leaders by nature and not through nurture should be dealt away with since every individual has the capacity of leading or managing others, the only requirement is trust, courage and faith in oneself. In comparison to a nation that is structured by scientific management, who conserves its resources and achieves good national efficiency in terms of labor and production, to one that does not, the latter suffers great loss through many inefficiencies occurring day in day out. Every individual has the responsibility to ensure that the nation’s resources are well managed by taking part in various management practices. According to Taylor, scientific management principles are applicable in all human related activities thus, people should call for elaborate collaborations in their actions (Taylor, 1991). Frederick Taylor came up with five elements of scientific management which are: labor, position, selection, actions and decisions, and management (Taylor, 1991). Elaborating the first element, labor, Taylor discussed the relationship between…...

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