Everglades

In: Other Topics

Submitted By MFidanza
Words 573
Pages 3
Introduction

The twenty seventh state of these United States of America is a place we like to call Flordia and down in the state there is a place called the Everglades, a big place that is divided bybodies of water known as watersheds. A good start point by the Kissimmee River. Man control has been trying to tame this range of grass rivers. All this for the greater good of H2O aka water. which is good for saving preserving while using it for plants and willdlife that are effected as they also need freshwater. My essay will focus on history f the Everglades and how locals realized how important it was to save the Everglades.

Background

The first written record of the Everlades was on Spanish maps made by cartographers who had not seen the land. They named the unknown area between the Gulf and Atlantic Coasts of Flordia Laguna Del Spirito (Lake of the Holy Spirit) The area appered in maps for decades without being explored. Writer John Grant Forbes stated in 1811 "The Indians represent (the south points) as impenetiable and the (British) as surveyors,wreckers and coasters had not means of exploring beyond the boarders of the sea coast and the mouths of rivers."1 Naturally the southern Flordia Southern waterflow is from Lake Okeechokee with Freshwater aka Everglades which estimated twenty thousant miles supporting many factors including farming,wilflife, and substaining many ecosystems that live there.The Everglades are the largest remaining sub-tropical wilderness in the lower forty eight states. They contain fresh water and salt water ares. They also contain open pirares,pine rocklands,tropical hardwood forests,offshore coral reefs, and mangrove forests.2 Many things have been happening for half a century since the Centeral and Southern Flordia Project which congress put into effect in the 1940's trying to save the freshwater for business companies,homes,and…...

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