Explain How Theories of Masculinity Have Transformed the Sociology of the Family?

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Submitted By castlemartyr
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Explain how theories of masculinity have transformed the sociology of the family? Finbarr Lawton,
University College Cork, Department of Sociology.

Student Number: 111310236,
Module title/code: Sociology of Family, SC2026,
Module Coordinator: Linda Connolly
Submission Date: 14/1/13

Throughout my essay I will attempt to look at different theories of masculinity and try to show how these theories have transformed the sociology of family in recent decades. I will start by looking at the sociology of family, giving a brief insight into the main theory’s and how it helps us to understand what the sociology of family is essentially about. Following on from this I will look at masculinity giving the main ideas of it and how it has changed and shifted roles in past decades. Before going into detail about masculinity and how it has changed by looking at theories of fatherhood, work, and unemployment and Hegemonic masculinity. Finally I will finish by looking at the main advantages and disadvantages of this change in masculinity in recent decades looking also at how it has changed the sociology of family.

When looking at the sociology of family we see that it is an extremely broad field of study and can really be split into four main theories of which to look at the sociology of family, these being: 1. “Functionalist theory: Looks at the essential tasks provided by the family e.g. Socialisation: Regulation of sexual activity.
Social placement: Material and emotional security. 2. Marxist theory: focuses on the way in which the family perpetuates and enables the continuity of the capitalist system and inequality. 3. Feminist theory: Emphasises gender inequalities in the family, such as, unequal division of power between husband and wife, domestic violence and sexual abuse. 4. Postmodern theories: Emphasise the plurality of family forms in…...

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