Fptp

In: Social Issues

Submitted By Hextorix
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Does the FPTP system hinder or enhance democracy?

Does our current voting system (FPTP) enhances or hinders democracy? The current UK voting system uses FPTP a simple system that most people agree to but is it benefiting our society? Or is it getting in the way of our society?

Our current voting system is the FPTP; votes are allowed to choose only one party on the ballot paper. When votes are counted they are only counted for the constituency at first, this chooses a party that will control the constituency and a leader who will represent them and gain a seat in the House of Commons. A main leader of the party that will represent the whole of the UK will be chosen after a party gains the majority of votes over how many constituencies they own and the leader will be selected that will represent the party and the whole of the UK.

The FPTP voting system is a simple and great way for the public to choose whatever leader they want to represent their constituency or the country. For example it shows a clear-cut choice between two parties and a third party fragmented minority party, which usually ends up in a coalition, but still takes at least 10% of seats within the UK. Voters are able to choose what MP’s they would like to represent their constituencies and to participate in the House of Commons for parliamentary law making. FPTP also gives a rise to single-party governments that tends to yield more percentage of seats than the percentage of votes giving the party more control of the country. Not only that voters can vote on a constituency leader but they also have a vote for the main leader representing the UK, this can be an advantage for some voters which do not like a party but prefer their leader to represent them. The FPTP system seems to enhance democracy as it involves citizens to actively vote on whichever leader or party they want, even if the party…...

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