Geography Suburbanisation A2

In: Social Issues

Submitted By lewisp8
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London: Contrasting Suburbs
This Factsheet looks at a cross section of London's suburbs. Suburbs were once seen as the homes of London's affluent commuters. But now many of these suburbs face problems of deprivation and neglect.

“The suburbs of London have a special place in our imagination and affections. Whether or not we actually live there, we feel we know them.
As the inspiration for novels and poetry, the butt of jokes or the setting of sitcoms, they have been part of the cultural landscape for decades.
But in this case familiarity has not always bred contempt. Even as we think of cherry blossom billowing across the neat avenues of
‘Metroland’, or net curtains twitching behind Neighbourhood Watch stickers, we know that the suburbs are more complicated and less cosy than their popular image”.

Definitions
Suburb, suburbia:. Suburbia generally refers to the outer residential parts of a continuously built-up city. A suburb is a socially homogeneous district within that area. The term carries connotations of fairly low densities of occupance and of a particular life style suited to family and leisure needs. [The Penguin Dictionary of Human Geography].

Philip Davies [Director, London Region, English Heritage]

Suburbanisation: The outward growth of urban development to engulf surrounding villages and rural areas.

“Suburbs are at risk of becoming new inner cities in terms of deprivation” [The Guardian December 31st 2003]

Suburbanisation and the Cycle of Urbanisation

The suburbs of the capital city cover almost two thirds of its area and house more than half its population. According to a recent Greater London
Authority publication [A city of Villages: Promoting a sustainable future for London’s suburbs] “Unlike other UK cities, London does not entirely conform to the pattern of deprived inner city and affluent suburban ring.…...

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