Has Canada Become a Post Industrial Society

In: Social Issues

Submitted By znazir1
Words 702
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Assignment One
Sociology 321
Zahra Nazir

Has Canada become a post-industrial society?

* What does “post-industrialism” mean and what are the main characteristics of “industrial” and “postindustrial” societies? * Using the concepts of “industrial” and “postindustrial” societies: How has work changed in Canada over time? (pg20,24)
Is “postindustrial” a proper description for Canadian society today?

Bell argued that postindustrial societies would engage most workers in the production and dissemination of knowledge, rather than in goods produc- tion as in industrial capitalism. While industrialization had brought increased productivity and higher living standards, postindustrial society would usher in an era of reduced concentration of power

Why the optimism in the early theories of postindustrial society? These explanations of social and economic change were developed in the decades following World War II, a time of significant economic growth in North America.16 White-collar occupational opportunities were increasing, edu- cational institutions were expanding, and the overall standard of living was rising. Hence the optimistic tone of the social theories being developed

In fact, as Canada industrialized, the government heavily subsidized the construction of railways in order to promote economic development.

Like other advanced capitalist societies, Canada has become a service-dominated economy. The informa- tion technology revolution is having a major impact on both the quantity and quality of work in the Canadian labour market, as are processes of industrial and labour market restructuring.

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An industrial society is one in which inanimate sources of energy such as coal or electricity fuel a production system that uses technology to process raw materials. But labelling a society “industrial” tells us little…...

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