Hong Kong and Shenzhen’s Coopetition in Logistics Industry

In: Business and Management

Submitted By 83524
Words 6825
Pages 28
| Hong Kong and Shenzhen’s Coopetition in Logistics Industry | Assignment 2 – LGT5013 Transport Logistics in China | | | CHAN PUI YUK, SIMON 10670562GFUNG MEI SHAN, JO 10670090GLEUNG TING CHEUNG, VINCE 10609081GLO WING LING, WINNIE 10634888GYIP KIM HUNG, CURTIS 09608879GYUEN MAY YEE, ELSA 10670039G |

Executive Summary

Hong Kong Port, being the world busiest port for 12 years from 1992 to 2004, is globally well known and this container port industry became one of its vital economic pillars. Such a prosperous development began in 1970s with the boom of manufacturing business activities. The effect on the end of ‘close-door policy’ of China was reflected in early 1990s due to the launching and the rapid development of ports among Pearl River Delta. Hong Kong started to face severe challenges from the neighboring ports, its market share drops significantly since 1997; whereas that of Shenzhen grows rapidly. The goal of this paper is to analysis the current situations of Hong Kong Port and its relationship with neighboring ports in Shenzhen; and to derive possible strategies for Hong Kong to maintain and sustain its competitiveness under these circumstances.
Table of Contents Chapter 1: Introduction 1 Chapter 2: Analysis 3 2.1 Hardware 3 2.2 Software 6 2.3. SWOT Analysis 10 2.4 Logistics Synergy (Co-opetition) of Hong Kong Plus Shenzhen 11 Chapter 3: Solutions 12 3.1 Framework Agreement 12 3.2 CEPA 12 3.3 PRD A5 Group 13 3.4 National 12th Five-Year Plan Budgeting 15 3.5 2030 Hong Kong International Airport Master Plan: Hong Kong International Airport – Gateway and Hub 16 3.6 Improve HKIA’s Transhipment Capability: Development of E-Commerce 17 3.7 The role of legislation 18 3.8 Develop Logistics Park 18 Chapter 4: Conclusion 19 References 20

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Chapter 1: Introduction

In 1970s, Hong Kong port experienced its…...

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