Lo1 Understanding Complimentary Therapy

In: Social Issues

Submitted By emmanuela
Words 4947
Pages 20
LO1 Understand Complimentary therapies that can be used by users of health and social care.
P1
Complimentary therapy means a different or alternative way of treating or preventing illness without the intake of drugs which involves healing practices.
Classification of complimentary therapies.
Physical therapy: This is a type of therapy which involve es exercises and other physical activities done on the body to improve health. This physical therapy includes;
Acupuncture: this a physical therapy that involves the use of fine pins inserted in the skin at specific points along the meridians. This therapy adjusts the body energy flow into healthier patterns.
But if the acupuncturist is not a qualified one then aim of the acupuncture might not be obtained. There are twelve primary acupuncture meridians that flow throughout the body, these acupuncture flow one into another; coupled together like two end of a hose. These paths ensure an even flow throughout the area of the body. Acupuncture points are locations along the meridians where the energy in that meridian merges and can be accused and affected. The effect of a point is done through stimulation with needles inserted into the defined location. Stimulation of the point is done through by the application of mechanical actions; heat or slight electrical micro-current can be applied on the needle.
Before acupuncture is done the acupuncturist examines the patient first and asses the condition of the body. It is also recommended for patients who do not respond to treatment but can be dangerous for patients with bleeding disorder as well.
Advantages
* It regulates blood pressure. * Stabilizes blood flow around all part of the body. * Helps to live a stronger and healthier life * A good solution for weight loss. * Increase roper metabolic activity.
Disadvantages
* It involves…...

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