Memory Distortions

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By valentine45
Words 479
Pages 2
As an eye witness of a crime and studying this unit, there is one trick for giving your memory a boost, Is to use mnemonic devices to encode items a special way. Three popular techniques is the Method of loci, peg words, and acronyms. There are other reasons for memory distortions, for instance epinephrine and cortisol are natural hormones in the body that affect the amygdale. The powerful effect of these hormones produce what is known as “flashbulb memories”, flashbulb memories are memories that are produced with surprising or emotional events in life. Another reason that could affect memory is the sleeper effect. The sleeper effect is like when students cram for a final the day before. Trying to memorize a lot of information at the same time really doesn’t help your memory it actually impedes it. You wouldn’t learn or remember as much unless you did a distributed practice which is spacing out you learning, you tend to retain more information a little bit at a time instead of trying to remember all at once. [4]
If, I was a juror and I knew about this information then I would definite bring it to light, the fact that we create our own memories to make life more efficient. There are numerous ways that people forgot information without even realizing it. Elizabeth Loftus did studies on manufacturing memories to bring this topic to light because a lot of people were serving time in prison because of these types of memories. She did a study about people visiting Disney World and asks about what type of characters they meet. For example Mickey Mouse, Minnie Mouse, and Bugs Bunny, Bugs Bunny is not a Disney character, there were a lot of people who remember touching and hugging Bugs Bunny at Disneyland, even thought we all know that this information is incorrect. I did more research on Loftus and it turns out that she herself had memories of finding her mother dead, when…...

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