Minorities in Prison

In: Social Issues

Submitted By txscorpio79
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Pages 9
Minorities in Prison, Why So Many?
Jennifer A. Spry
ENG 122: English Composition II
Ava Hardiek
January 7, 2013

Minorities in Prison, Why So Many?
Introduction
Racism has been a part of history for many years and is a very real problem in the world, not just in the United States. For example, New England colonists fled to a new land, later to be known as America, for religious freedom from European dictators, early settlers of the United States enslaved African-Americans, Adolf Hitler murdered millions of Jewish people, and Middle Eastern Muslim terrorists destroyed the World Trade Towers killing thousands. In the United States, before the Civil rights movement, African-Americans were severely discriminated against. They were not allowed into certain restaurants, they were given restrooms and water fountains that were only used by “colored people”, and they were forced to sit in the back of the bus. Schools and neighborhoods were segregated and interracial relationships were forbidden. Racism was considered socially acceptable and the judicial system upheld arrests and convictions of those that did not conform to the laws. It was impossible for a person of color to receive a fair trial. Today the judicial system is designed to punish criminals for the crime not their minority status, but the truth can still be twisted by racism. Some people argue that the law is flawed and the courts are biased because we are judged by a group of people who are randomly selected to decide the accused criminal’s fate, also known as a “jury of our peers”. Justice is supposed to be blind, but isn’t it impossible for lady justice to be blind if we are judged by those who are not? This research paper will discuss the racial disparity in the judicial system, crime rates, and whether or not they have an effect on the high minority prison population.
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