Philosophical Terms Exercise

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University of Phoenix Material

Philosophical Terms Exercise

Define the following terms in your own words:

metaphysics: Meta is a Greek term generally meaning beyond. So in describing Metaphysics I would describe it in terms that go beyond the standard explanation of physics. Meaning that the laws of physics would seem to conflict with or not be able to define the metaphysical. Metaphysics would be the study of anything that cannot be explained or transcends scientific explanation.

epistemology: This is the branch of psychology concerned with the nature and scope of knowledge. This mainly addresses the following questions: What is knowledge? How is knowledge obtained? How much or to what extent can knowledge of a subject be obtained?

ontology: The study of the nature of being existence or reality. Some questions ontology tries to answer. What is existence? What is a physical object? What constitutes the identity of an object? When does an object go out of existence?

axiology: This is the physiological study of value. This can be thought of as ethics and aesthetics. This study tries to answer what is right and good in individual and social conduct. Aesthetics studies the concept of beauty and harmony.

Match the philosophical approach with the appropriate arguments below. Each approach may be used more than once.

metaphysics ontology epistemology axiology

1. Are there facts of right and wrong, or are these values relative or subject to cultural variations? Axiology_________

2. Descartes wrote, “Cogito ergo sum” – “I think, therefore I am.” Epistemology________

3. Plato’s theory of forms asserts that the world we think we see around us is an illusion. Metaphysics_________

4. “Descartes argues that there is no less contradiction in conceiving a supremely perfect being…...

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