Tagore

In: English and Literature

Submitted By dipanwita
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TAGORE THE WORLD OVER: ENGLISH AS THE VEHICLE William Radice I delivered this speech at the Commonwealth Club in London on 22 March 2006, at an evening function entitled ‘Tagore’s Gifts to English’. The function was sponsored by the English-Speaking Union and the Royal Commonwealth Society, and masterminded by Mr Michael Marland, CBE, a retired London headteacher and keen admirer of Tagore. There were readings of poems from Gitanjali and other texts; a performance of Frank Bridge’s gloriously passionate settings for tenor voice and piano of two poems from The Gardener (composed in 1922: the poems are Nos. 29 and 30, ‘Speak to me, my love’ and ‘Dweller in my deathless dreams’); a presentation on Sriniketan and Dartington (Tagore and Elmhirst) by the The Tagoreans, an old-established London-based group; and a song and dance sequence called ‘The Golden Boat’, designed and performed by the Tagore Centre UK. Also, poem No. 9 from ‘Prantik’ was read in the original Bengali and in English, French, German and Slovenian, to illustrate the ‘third Tagore’ – not the Bengali Rabindranath, not the English Tagore, but the new and fuller impression that is emerging the world over through new translations. One particular memory I shall keep from the evening is the way the two poems I chose from Gitanjali came wonderfully alive as read by my PhD student Mayurika Chakravorty. Listening to her highly dramatic reading in her Calcutta-accented English of Nos. 48 (‘The morning sea of silence’) and 57 (‘Light, my light, the world-filling light’), I realised for the first time that the rhythms of Tagore’s English Gitanjali are Indian rhythms. They need to be read by an Indian voice, with an accent and intonation similar to Tagore’s own, as those were the rhythms that were in his head when he wrote his English versions.

It’s taken me…...

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English

...------------------------------------------------- Rabindranath Tagore Rabindranath Tagore, also written Ravīndranātha Thākura[1] (7 May 1861 – 7 August 1941),[b]sobriquet Gurudev,[c] was a Bengali polymath[3] who reshaped Bengali literature and music, as well as Indian art with Contextual Modernism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Author of Gitanjali and its "profoundly sensitive, fresh and beautiful verse",[4] he became the first non-European to win the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1913.[5] In translation his poetry was viewed as spiritual and mercurial; however, his "elegant prose and magical poetry" remain largely unknown outside Bengal.[6]Sometimes referred to as "the Bard of Bengal",[7] Tagore introduced new prose and verse forms and the use of colloquial language into Bengali literature, thereby freeing it from traditional models based on classical Sanskrit. He was highly influential in introducing the best of Indian culture to the West and vice versa, and he is generally regarded as the outstanding creative artist of the modern Indian subcontinent. A Pirali Brahmin from Calcutta with ancestral gentry roots in Jessore, Tagore wrote poetry as an eight-year-old.[8] At the age of sixteen, he released his first substantial poems under the pseudonym Bhānusiṃha ("Sun Lion"), which were seized upon by literary authorities as long-lost classics.[9][10] By 1877 he graduated to his first short stories and dramas, published under his real name. As a humanist,......

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Frontline

...114 Remembering TAGORE On his 150th birth anniversary VOLUME 28 NUMBER 27 TH E STAT E S Fiery trap in Kolkata 41 SC IE NCE Higgs signal? 44 WOR L D A F F A I R S Iraq: Exit America War crimes in the trash Russia: December Revolution Pakistan: Volatile state India & China: Troubled equations DECEMBER 31, 2011 - JANUARY 13, 2012 C O V ER S T O RY 49 52 ISSN 0970-1710 Timeless Tagore As an activist, thinker, poet and rural reconstructionist, Rabindranath Tagore continues to be relevant. A tribute on the 150th anniversary of his birth. 4 WWW.FRONTLINE.IN Jayati Ghosh: Mess in eurozone R.K. Raghavan: A lost battle? 108 118 BOOKS LE TTE R S 73 127 54 57 61 TR AVE L Jungles of Borneo 64 AR T Achuthan Kudallur’s journey 85 H ISTOR Y Of Quit India, Nehru & Communist split 89 FOOD SEC UR I T Y Understanding the PDS Kerala: Power of literacy Bihar: Coupon fiasco Jharkhand: Strong revival Chhattisgarh: Loud no to cash E CONOM Y Losing momentum Interview: C. Rangarajan, Chairman, PMEAC CL IM A TE C H A N G E Uncertain stand in Durban CONTR OV E R S Y Mullaperiyar dispute: Deep distrust Fallout of fear OBITU A R Y Humble genius: Mario Miranda Korea’s Kim Jong-il COL U M N Bhaskar Ghose: Looking back Praful Bidwai: Durban greenwash 96 98 101 104 106 RELA T ED S TOR I E S Language barrier 14 Poet of the Padma17 The other Tagore 22 Unique......

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Sorry

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