Validity of an Argument

In: Business and Management

Submitted By shrestha
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Pages 2
Validity of an Argument
Samir Shrestha
HUMN210-E5WW (FA12)
Miriam Abbott
September 22, 2012 Part I We are closed,
But you can come in.
Contradiction: The office is closed and we can go in. Part II

A. Argument’s conclusion
➢ The conclusion of the argument is : It is a cat.

B. Premises
➢ All cats have four legs
➢ It has four legs.

C. Symbolizing the argument
➢ Let, C= It is a cat and Let F= It has four legs.
➢ C → F
➢ F
➢ Thus, C
Here,
Antecedent = It is a cat.
Consequent = It has four legs.
D. It is a deductive argument because the premises are used with the intention to prove the conclusion.

E. Yes, the conclusion can be a false statement. Despite the facts that the premises are true, conclusion derived from it can be false. Here, the evaluation of the argument on the basis of the intellectual standard of logical validity can help to prove that only one similar characteristic is not enough to prove a claim.

F. It is an invalid deductive argument. As we know, an invalid deductive argument consists of false conclusion despite the true premises. The conclusion arrived by the deduction can be strongly interfered by the addition of new premises. For instant cat’s paws are small can alter the conclusion of the given argument, as the paws of the dog are comparatively bigger than that of cat, thus making it invalid.
G. Argument Form:
➢ Affirming the Consequent
General Form:
1. p → q
2. q
3. Thus, p
H. I think the little dog is guilty of using his reasoning and the information involved to derive something false from something true. Since this argument has true premises and a false conclusion, it is an invalid deductive argument.

Reference
Cartoon Stock. (n.d.). Retrieved September 19, 2012 from…...

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