Volkswagen Case

In: Business and Management

Submitted By Pascal
Words 321
Pages 2
VW case

VW heeft een uitstekende research- en developmentfaciliteit in Duitsland en de productiefaciliteit is modern en efficiënt. De Amerikanen hebben een uitgebreid en kwalitatief goed dealernetwerk (voor verkoop en service). Ik zou een aantal werknemers uitwisselen, en zo de benodigde kennis delen, aangezien er in beide landen verbetering mogelijk is.
Daarnaast is er maar één VW model in de Verenigde Staten. Ik zou kijken naar de behoefte van de klant en hierop inspelen. Als de mensen daar behoefte hebben aan grote wagens, zou VW bijvoorbeeld de Touraeg kunnen introduceren, idem dito voor andere modellen, zoals bijvoorbeeld de BlueMotion modellen, dit zijn zuinige auto's met weinig CO2 uitstoot.
De kostenontwikkelingen in Duitsland wordt als ongunstig bestempeld, maar in de VS stimuleert de overheid bedrijven juist om werkgelegenheid te creëren door middel van subsidies en belastingfaciliteiten. Dit zou het erg interessant kunnen maken voor VW om de productie naar de VS te kunnen verhuizen.
VW twijfelt hierover vanwege de macht van de vakbonden in de VS. Ik stel voor om de standpunten van deze vakbonden te achterhalen en hierop in te spelen, desnoods door te lobbyen.
Amerikanen geven vooral de voorkeur aan 'Made in USA', maar General Motors (GM) is niet in staat om kleine motoren te ontwikkelen en te produceren, dit is juist waar VW met kop en schouders boven de rest uitsteekt. Het kan interessant zijn om een samenwerking met GM aan te gaan of om bijvoorbeeld alleen kleine motoren te gaan leveren.
De Amerikaanse auto-industrie heeft te lijden onder de concurrentie, voornamelijk uit Japan. VW kan hierop inspelen door te innoveren, bijvoorbeeld door hybride/elektrische modellen te introduceren. Bovendien staan de Duitsers bekend om hun uitstekende kwaliteit, misschien wel de beste ter wereld (zie Audi, BMW, Mercedes).
Er dreigt een tekort in de…...

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