Waste Water Treatment in India

In: Business and Management

Submitted By sith88
Words 956
Pages 4
Opportunities and Challenges in Waste Water Treatment Market in India

India's economy is the eleventh largest in the world by nominal GDP and the fourth largest by purchasing power parity (PPP). Following strong economic reforms from the socialist inspired economy of a post-independence Indian nation, the country began to develop a fastpaced economic growth, as free market principles were initiated in 1990 for international competition and foreign investment. The environment market in India is one that is developing rapidly. Environment-consciousness is gaining ascendancy thereby enhancing demand for hazardous waste management facilities. The ministry of environment and forests has identified 18 highly polluting industry sectors but the most sophisticated technology will have to be imported. There are good prospects for joint-ventures between Indian and foreign companies in this field. In a country famed for its superstitious beliefs and practices, there was no opposition - rather, there was a public welcome - to a clean-up of the Ganges which is considered a Holy River among the majority Hindus. The fact that society acknowledged that their Holy River could be polluted points to a growing understanding of environmental issues in India. And this is good news for foreign and domestic environment-related businesses. In addition to this, there are several products that India needs to import, some of which are storage containers made of, or lined with, waste-handling category materials, polyethylene packaging carbuoys, spill-combat equipment, communications and alarm systems and decontamination equipment. The future of the environment scenario is likely to see an upswing. 60 per cent of India's forest area is in 180 districts of the country which have a very substantial tribal population and 250 million people depend on forests for their daily livelihood, there must…...

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