Youtube Case Study

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OuYouTube Case Study 1) Competitive forces like PC’s that have DVD writers and readers, portable video players, free video downloading and of course, the internet has challenged the movie industry. Problems that these forces have created are that more people will want to download movies illegally off the internet than purchase them when they come out on DVD or Blue Ray. Movie and television studios made it possible for movies to be sold online via download to combat the illegal downloading problem. 2) Disruptive technology has impacted YouTube by making it negotiate licensing agreements, copyright infringement and all this to prevent people from viewing illegal content. 3) The movie studios have dealt with YouTube by negotiating license agreements that would make movies available to be viewed legally. The goal of the response is to eliminate viewing of copyrighted content on YouTube. The movie studios can learn that they can sell content over the internet to make profit just like the music industry used iTunes to produce revenue. 4) Motion Picture companies should definitely use YouTube to promote their new films because YouTube is the most popular video sharing website in the world and millions of people are on YouTube daily. 5) I find that there are many videos, some made by the studio that the movie was filmed by and others made by random people that uploaded the video under “fair use”. Both ways created publicity for the movie and thus making the movie profitable online. There are advertisements attached to the video, often related to the movie or another movie by the same studio. This way of advertising is definitely effective because many people will watch the video on YouTube and spread it on twitter, Facebook, and other social media…...

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